Meet The Women In My Life – Part 26 – Joy

Womens Month 2019 - Joy Moyo

Since International Women’s Day, (which was the 8th of March 2019), I’ve been sharing one interview a day.

To celebrate them, I’ve interviewed the women in my life to share their perspective on things. I included parents, siblings, cousins, aunties and even friends.

It’s no secret that we live in a male-dominated global culture and women are often at the shorter end of the stick, especially when they are more than capable to do what men can do in society, and often more! People are people, regardless of gender.

The coin does flip both ways so I look forward to doing one for the guys too.

Today’s interview is with another hardworking career woman in Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe.  She is such a beam of light and a force to behold. Many people around the world will know her as she works in tourism. Meet my fun and feisty friend Joy…

I am blessed to have a circle of phenomenal men around me which most people don’t. Men who often don’t make a final decision before actually seeking my point of view.

Interviews coming each day for a month so make sure to subscribe, options found to the right or in the menu above, (or at the very bottom on phone browsers).

Women's Day 2019 - Joy Moyo

I’ve asked all the ladies the same questions and this is what they had to say…

Joy Moyo

Current location: Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe

Born in: Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Joy Moyo - 41 - Sales and Marketing Manager (Tourism Sector)
Joy Moyo – 41 – Sales and Marketing Manager (Tourism Sector)

Hiya Joy, what makes you a woman?

My children, the phenomenal women around me and the will power to keep on going, no matter what the obstacles are.

Who is one of the women you respect the most and why?

My mother. She is a tough cookie with a beautiful soul. She’s raised her children with so little and yet gave us so much more than any material thing could give anyone.

She is a gentle woman, and her ability to embrace everyone, even people who she has differences with is mind blowing.

Joy Moyo
Joy Moyo

If you were a man, what do you think life would be like as compared to now?

Life would probably be easy if I was a man because I wouldn’t have to work triple times to get the same respect and recognition from my peers and those one interacts with on a daily basis.

I wouldn’t have to jump through as many hoops as I have jumped through. Life would be different in the sense that I wouldn’t hold my children a little longer and enjoy the milestones and the “little” things which are little-big things to women and moms.

That said I appreciate and value being a woman as the challenges and double time we put in is worth the ride.

Customer care is at the forefront of Joys job
Customer care is at the forefront of Joy’s job

What do you struggle with most in life?

Taking care of everyone else and forgetting ‘me’ the bulk of the time.

What do you enjoy the most in life?

Meeting new people, which my job affords me all the time.

Learning, learning never ends. I am blessed with the fact that I get to enjoy what I do. The tourism industry is not only work, but play and the relationships forged and friendships acquired are for a lifetime.

Joy Moyo hanging out with a couple of birds in Australia
Joy Moyo hanging out with a couple of birds in Australia

One gets to travel the world without even going anywhere.

What one thing would you like to tell all the women out there?

Be your sister’s keeper. Fix another sister’s crown every time you get the chance.

What one thing would you like to tell all the men out there?

Value the women in your life and in general. Give credit where it’s due without the double standards, because even if the double standards are put to deter women, women are rocks and once they put their mind into doing something, they will do it.

Joy in action with her fitness boot camp buddies
Joy in action with her fitness boot camp buddies

What is your dream?

I have a lot of dreams…

To grow old and see my children flourish in life. To see women uplifting each other in life.

Joy with her son
Joy with her son

To grow my business network which has steadily grown and awesome contacts and referrals always coming.

I want to continue travelling and showing my children the endless possibilities this world has in store.

Anything else you’d like to add?

II am blessed to have a circle of phenomenal men around me which most people don’t. Men who often don’t make a final decision before actually seeking my point of view.

Problem solving on the job
Problem solving on the job

For that, I thank you because I don’t have to jump hoops anymore. That is huge and equally I have a circle of phenomenal women who not only support me at work but support each other’s children and families.

Thanks Joy xo

Don’t miss this whole month’s Women’s Day special and get sent the next interview by subscribing to the right side of this page (or at the very bottom on phone browsers) or by clicking here

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Meet The Women In My Life – Part 23 – Claire

Since International Women’s Day, (which was the 8th of March 2019), I’ve been sharing one interview a day.

To celebrate them, I’ve interviewed the women in my life to share their perspective on things. I included parents, siblings, cousins, aunties and even friends.

It’s no secret that we live in a male-dominated global culture and women are often at the shorter end of the stick, especially when they are more than capable to do what men can do in society, and often more! People are people, regardless of gender.

The coin does flip both ways so I look forward to doing one for the guys too.

Today’s interview is with another one of my musical female friends like Lauren. We also met at Musicamp when we were younger. Meet musician mom, Claire…

Men and women think differently, and can have different expectations. Assumptions are dangerous, so take the time to explain and to listen.

Interviews coming each day for a month so make sure to subscribe, options found to the right or in the menu above, (or at the very bottom on phone browsers).

Women's Day 2019 - Claire Bradnum

I’ve asked all the ladies the same questions and this is what they had to say…

Claire Bradnum

Current location: Harare, Zimbabwe

Born in: Harare, Zimbabwe

Claire Bradnum - 33 - Music Teacher
Claire Bradnum – 33 – Music Teacher

Hiya Claire, what makes you a woman?

Well, I have two X chromosomes. And I have gone through puberty, and become an adult.

Who is one of the women you respect the most and why?

Clare Griffiths – A truly amazing, unsung hero, who works behind the scenes to help so many people in so many ways. Clare has an incredible ability to feel the pain she sees and to heal it where she can. She is hugely creative, hugely talented, and Christ shines through her.

Abby Johnson – She is able to tell the truth when people don’t want to hear the truth. She has gone through so much and met with such resistance to her message but it doesn’t stop her.

Kechi Okwuchi – I can’t even begin to think what that woman has been through, but she shares her gifts with the world. Her music, her heart, her inner fighter and survivor, and ability and willingness to reach out and touch people.

Saint Hildegaard – I wish I could have been a fly on the wall 800 years ago when this incredible woman was putting together her recipes. She didn’t take nonsense from anyone, and knew she had something beneficial to give the world.

My family is full of strong and courageous women that I respect and admire, who give/gave selflessly, tirelessly and passionately. A few worth mentioning would be:

Newborn
Newborn

My sisters – Pillars of strength, thoroughly capable, caring women, fighting their own battles but always looking out for others. Intuitive, intelligent, strong.

Granny Eileen – She was a fascinating woman, who told it like it is. She bore huge pain, but was still a passionate and compassionate person. I wish I could have gotten to have a few conversations with her as an adult.

Aunty Stella – She is one of the bravest women I know whose heart burns for her country. She has been through so much. She has such a generous and selfless spirit.

And last but not least, my beautiful mom – Graceful, gracious, determined, dedicated, gentle. Passionate, supportive, humble, appreciative. Careful, considerate, generous, long-suffering, committed, joyful, observant. Protective, intelligent. Close to God. Disciplined. Invaluable.

If you were a man, what do you think life would be like as compared to now?

It’s hard to say. I probably would have pursued things differently, I would have received different education, as I attended an all girls school, and I probably would have had different opportunities open to me, so I’m sure I would be living a very different life.

Catching up with Claire in Harare Zimbabwe
Catching up with Claire in Harare Zimbabwe

Personally, though, I don’t think being a woman has worked against me in my career, unless it was too subtle to notice and I wasn’t aware. I have not felt discriminated against.

What do you struggle with the most in life?

With myself – I struggle with never living up to my own expectations. I am my biggest critic, and never quite measure up to what I know I am capable of.

Claire Bradnum
Claire Bradnum

With others, I struggle to come to terms with the fact that the world’s purse strings are controlled by people, all over the world, who care so little about the planet, and their fellow human compatriots of this world. I struggle with selfishness.

What do you enjoy the most in life?

Creativity and the opportunities I have to be creative. Spending time with people who love and appreciate me, and who I love and appreciate. Especially my children.

Claire and her kids
Claire and her kids

Composing. Playing my instruments, probably the recorder the most, and piano. Helping my students achieve something that started off challenging.

What one thing would you like to tell all the women out there?

Trust your intuition, Exercise it. The more you use it, the stronger it will get. You can rely on it.

Keep asking yourself, is this really important? Will it matter in 5 years time? 10 years?

Prioritise your life.

Jim Rohn says, in the end you must choose one of two pains: the pain of discipline, or the pain of regret.

 Claire and the Harare International School parent choir
Claire and the Harare International School parent choir

What one thing would you like to tell all the men out there?

Communication is key. Men and women think differently, and can have different expectations. Assumptions are dangerous, so take the time to explain and to listen.

What is your dream?

To bring Zimbabweans together through music. To provide music education and music opportunities to as many Zimbabweans as I can.

A music centre, a series of camps for musicians – including piano camps – which involves owning enough pianos.

Claire hanging out with some students
Claire hanging out with some students

Recorder Orchestra. Workshops. School festivals. I would love to see the choir and orchestra I began to bring the community of Harare together, really and truly take off.

Anything else you’d like to add?

I am very glad that women are being appreciated and acknowledged, supported and protected more, and I also realise that in some societies we still have further to go, but I would like to say still we must be careful not to attempt to replace the role of the man with the woman.

I don’t wish to see women valued at the expense of men, just as I do not wish to see men valued at the expense of women.

Women cannot fill the role of men. Only men can do that. Men cannot fill the role of women. Only women can do that. We must not seek to be the same, because we are not.

Claire in action accompanying school choirs
Claire in action accompanying school choirs

Personally I am not interested in women trying to do everything men can do. I am interested in women being given the chance, the space, the opportunity, the support, funding, and encouragement, to do and be everything that women can do and be.

Women are important. But so are men. Our differences must be acknowledged and celebrated.

Thanks Claire xo

Don’t miss this whole month’s Women’s Day special and get sent the next interview by subscribing to the right side of this page (or at the very bottom on phone browsers) or by clicking here

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Meet The Women In My Life – Part 7 – Lynne

Womens Month 2019 - Lynne Ashley

Since International Women’s Day, (which was the 8th of March 2019), I’ve been sharing one interview a day.

To celebrate them, I’ve interviewed the women in my life to share their perspective on things. I included parents, siblings, cousins, aunties and even friends.

It’s no secret that we live in a male-dominated global culture and women are often at the shorter end of the stick, especially when they are more than capable to do what men can do in society, and often more! People are people, regardless of gender.

The coin does flip both ways so I look forward to doing one for the guys too.

Today’s interview is with my cousin Lynne…

Shout out to all the men, the role models respecting women. Stepping up, being dads. Thank you.

Interviews coming each day for a month so make sure to subscribe, options found to the right or in the menu above.

Womens Month 2019 - Lynne Ashley

I’ve asked all the ladies the same questions and this is what they had to say…

Lynne Ashley

Current location: Harare, Zimbabwe

Born in: Harare, Zimbabwe

Lynne Ashley - 39 - Early Childhood Teacher
Lynne Ashley – 39 – Early Childhood Teacher

Hiya cuz, what makes you a woman?

Basically I’d say motherhood, my boldness, self respect, strength, love and passion.

Who is one of the women you respect the most and why?

My gran and my mom. My gran is amazing to have raised six mixed-race children in the era that she raised them. To be able to look at what amazing children they are today and how much they’ve achieved.

My mom being the eldest of them. All the struggles she’s gone through. Then my aunts, all my mom’s sisters. I look up to them. I can’t even begin to imagine what they had to go through, living in the time and growing up in the time that they did.

Family vibes in Harare
Family vibes in Harare. My Gran with some of her kids, grandkids and great-grandkids

If you were a man, what do you think life would be like, as compared to
now?

Wow, I think my life would be completely different if I were a man right now. It would be a lot easier. We live in a world of male dominance and male privilege, so it’s harder to achieve success being a woman. So I feel like I would be a lot more successful if I was a male. But in as much as I’ve said that, I would not change anything regarding what I’ve gone through. If I had to pick, I would always choose to be a woman any day of the week.

What do you struggle with the most in life?

I would say I struggle with fake people. You are surrounded by so many superficial people that it’s just a constant struggle trying to figure out who is being absolutely genuine with you. It’s a daily struggle.

What do you enjoy the most in life?

I love being a woman. I love motherhood. I love travelling and love reading.

Some of the very simple things like sunsets, the sun on my face, the wind in my hair, hugs, a warm smile. Genuine, warm smiles touch my soul. Those are the small pleasures that you don’t get to encounter all the time.

Lynne Ashley
Lynne Ashley

What one thing would you like to tell all the women out there?

Wow, I don’t think I could actually say one thing…

Um, you’re amazing as a woman. There are going to be good days. There are going to be bad days, but keep your crown on. We’re all queens trying to make the most of our situations. Just be the most authentic possible you, you can be. Be kind to yourself. Be an inspiration to other women.

Be fearless. Respect other women. Don’t tear other women down. That’s one thing that is really frustrating about women, we seem to tear each other down. If we could just aggressively support each other and not compete. Trust God and know your worth. Set boundaries. Set standards and dare to dream.

What one thing would you like to tell all the men out there?

Shout out to all the men, the role models respecting women. Stepping up, being dads. Thank you.

For the men that aren’t doing that. It’s sad, but there’s still room to be a better version of yourself. To the present dads, hats off to you. To all the absent fathers, you have no idea what you’re missing out on. You can’t even begin to imagine what you’re missing out on and how much damage you’re doing to your children, so please step up.

Lynne with her daughter, niece and cousin Taz
Lynne with her daughter, niece and cousin Taz

What is your dream?

Definitely to leave my daughter and my grandchildren a legacy. I might have more children so maybe my ‘children’.

Um, I’m such a yoga enthusiast. I would love to have a yoga studio at some point. I’d love to teach yoga. I would love to travel.

I would love to have a little bistro cafe, drive diner type thing and a school. I’d love to open a school.

Lynne Ashley
Lynne Ashley

Anything else you would like to add?

Knowledge is power. Be kind. Live life to the fullest. Love fearlessly and keep trusting God. I would also like to see a world with more tolerance and less hatred.

Thanks Lynne xo

Don’t miss this whole month’s Women’s Day special and get sent the next interview by subscribing to the right side of this page or by clicking here

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Meet The Women In My Life – Part 4 – Abiba

Womens Month 2019 - Abiba-Web

Since International Women’s Day, (which was the 8th of March 2019), I’ve been sharing one interview a day.

To celebrate them, I’ve interviewed the women in my life to share their perspective on things. I included parents, siblings, cousins, aunties and even friends.

It’s no secret that we live in a male-dominated global culture and women are often at the shorter end of the stick, especially when they are more than capable to do what men can do in society, and often more! People are people, regardless of gender.

The coin does flip both ways so I look forward to doing one for the guys too.

Today’s interview is with my mom’s younger sister Abiba…

Where you are the mother and the father.

Interviews coming each day for a month so make sure to subscribe, options found to the right or in the menu above.

International Women's Day 2019 - Abiba Omar

 

I’ve asked all the ladies the same questions and this is what they had to say…

Abiba Omar

Current location: Harare, Zimbabwe

Born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (which became Harare, Zimbabwe in 1980)

Abiba Omar - 56 - Store Manager
Abiba Omar – 56 – Store Manager

Hiya Aunty, what makes you a woman?

What makes me a women, in a male-dominated world is being a single mum. Where you are the mother and the father.

Who is one of the women you respect the most and why?

My mum Jane Omar who never went to school and raised six children, largely as a single parent. She always demanded the best from us and she taught herself many things.

Abiba with her mother Jane and niece Lynne
Abiba with her mother Jane and niece Lynne

If you were a man, what do you think life would be like, as compared to
now?

Wow. Ummm women are never taken seriously. Never given respect, no matter what post you have at work. Being a male manager would be a different ball game to now, being the only female manager in a male-dominated company. Oh the stories I could tell to demonstrate just that!

What do you struggle with the most in life?

When people talk at you, never actually to you.

What do you enjoy the most in life?

Having my freedom to choose what l want to do in my life.

Abiba Omar
Abiba Omar

What one thing would you like to tell all the women out there?

Being a single mum is not the end of the world, you can still achieve what you want in life.

Abiba Omar
Abiba Omar

What one thing would you like to tell all the men out there?

For them to get off their high horses, we also can do what they can do.

What is your dream?

To live and see my children and grandchildren achieve their dreams and goals in life.

Anything else you would like to add?

God created me in his own image and sees the expression of who he is through me. God values me and l honour him by valuing myself too.

Abiba in primary school
Abiba in primary school

Thanks Abiba xo

Don’t miss this whole month’s Women’s Day special and get sent the next interview by subscribing to the right side of this page or by clicking here

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Meet The Women In My Life – Part 3 – Anifa

Womens Month 2019 - Anifa-Web

Since International Women’s Day, (which was the 8th of March 2019), I’ve been sharing one interview a day.

To celebrate them, I’ve interviewed the women in my life to share their perspective on things. I included parents, siblings, cousins, aunties and even friends.

It’s no secret that we live in a male-dominated global culture and women are often at the shorter end of the stick, especially when they are more than capable to do what men can do in society, and often more! People are people, regardless of gender.

The coin does flip both ways so I look forward to doing one for the guys too.

Today’s interview is with my mom’s older sister Anifa…

 I remember my dad had to bribe the Counsellor in order for my mum to live with us.

Interviews coming each day for a month so make sure to subscribe, options found to the right or in the menu above.

International Women's Day 2019 - Anifa Omar

 

I’ve asked all the ladies the same questions and this is what they had to say…

Anifa Omar

Current location: Tamworth, England

Born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (which became Harare, Zimbabwe in 1980)

Anifa Omar - 60 - Phlebotomist
Anifa Omar – 60 – Phlebotomist

Hiya Aunty, what makes you a woman?

I am a strong person who makes life easier for my family. I am able to multi task in many ways. Giving birth is one of the most amazing things a woman can do.

Who is one of the women you respect the most and why?

Jane Omar my mother, who raised us on her own. My mother was married young and bore six children with my dad and only to be let down. She dusted herself off and started a new life for herself, because my dad decided to keep us all away from her. When my dad then abandoned us, my mum had to pick up the pieces and that’s why I am who I am, because of her hard work. Love you Jane. ❤️

Granny Jane Omar
Granny Jane Omar – Anifa’s mother

If you were a man, what do you think life would be like, as compared to
now?

Well for one, I would look after my family and love them like no tomorrow. Respect women and treat them like a Queen 👸 because without women, men would not be around and a man would not be the person he is today. Men need to be more responsible and faithful to all those they love.

What do you struggle with the most in life?

I struggle most with family. I pray we could all be closer and love each other more. To be there forever, for all, in sickness, health and death. I love my family very much and would do anything for them all. I just feel that the love in my family is often one-sided and that makes me sad 😔.

I pray one day hopefully we will be a proper happy family. 😁

What do you enjoy the most in life?

Being happy and in love with all those who are close to me. Spending time with my children and grandchildren, who I miss very much.

Anifa's grand kids in Zimbabwe
Anifa’s grandkids in Zimbabwe

What one thing would you like to tell all the women out there?

Love yourself and be proud to be who you are. Strong and beautiful.

What one thing would you like to tell all the men out there?

Grow up and take responsibility for your actions. Be proud fathers to all your children and be good husbands to your wives. Love them forever.

What is your dream?

I pray that I have good health so I can be there for all my family and live a happy, strong life. To have enough money to live a comfortable life with all my loved ones.

Anifa Omar
Anifa Omar

Anything else you would like to add?

I am the second eldest in a family of six. When growing up in the 60s, it was amazing. Years later we moved into a *coloured suburb called Arcadia. I remember my dad had to bribe the Counsellor in order for my mum to live with us! This was because my mother is black and my dad was mixed race. No black people were allowed to live in *coloured areas!

*Note that in Zimbabwe/Southern Africa, ‘coloured’ means mixed race/multiracial as opposed to African American/Black in other regions.

 

Anyway, to cut a long story short, our nightmare started. We went to visit our gran for the weekend, only to come home and find our mother gone! Dad tells us that we got a new mother. Life was hell and we were only little, still in primary school. We would be locked out of the house when we got home from school. That’s with no food and sometimes the neighbour would take us in till our dad came home.

Anifa Omar in Zimbabwe
Anifa Omar in Zimbabwe

Then the biggest nightmare began when our dad decided he wanted to move to Mozambique, but without his children, being me and my siblings. We had nowhere to go, so had to live with our grandmother in an African township where *coloured people weren’t accepted. Life was hard but we had to soldier on and had to grow up very fast.

I had to leave school at sixteen to go out and work so I could help my mum to look after my siblings. We moved to Southerton and then a new journey began for us all, and, our mother was always there with us. I am here now and very happy that I made a difference in my children’s lives and mine too.

Hahaha, we could write a book and call it the long winding road of The Omars. 😆😆

Thanks Anifa xo

Don’t miss this whole month’s Women’s Day special and get sent the next interview by subscribing to the right side of this page or by clicking here

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